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kccuber
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

-ElectronicArts- wrote:

quick question: how to instal windows 11 on an unsupported device
https://technoresult.com/create-windows-11-bootable-usb-for-unsupported-device-using-rufus/


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MagicCrayon9342
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

kccuber wrote:

-ElectronicArts- wrote:

quick question: how to instal windows 11 on an unsupported device
https://technoresult.com/create-windows-11-bootable-usb-for-unsupported-device-using-rufus/
you will need to also not be scared of the registry. Don't worry give it a try, you won't break anything. There's some registry keys you'll have to edit after booting the USB to make the installer let you get past not having TPM.

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kccuber
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

kccuber wrote:

-ElectronicArts- wrote:

quick question: how to instal windows 11 on an unsupported device
https://technoresult.com/create-windows-11-bootable-usb-for-unsupported-device-using-rufus/
you will need to also not be scared of the registry. Don't worry give it a try, you won't break anything. There's some registry keys you'll have to edit after booting the USB to make the installer let you get past not having TPM.
you dont need registry hacking skills for the linked tutorial, i suggest you actually thoroughly look at posts before replying


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MagicCrayon9342
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

kccuber wrote:

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

kccuber wrote:

-ElectronicArts- wrote:

quick question: how to instal windows 11 on an unsupported device
https://technoresult.com/create-windows-11-bootable-usb-for-unsupported-device-using-rufus/
you will need to also not be scared of the registry. Don't worry give it a try, you won't break anything. There's some registry keys you'll have to edit after booting the USB to make the installer let you get past not having TPM.
you dont need registry hacking skills for the linked tutorial, i suggest you actually thoroughly look at posts before replying
I can literally boot off a Windows 11 boot media and it won't let me install unless I do the registry hack. I preferably use that unofficial windows media tool and upgrade from windows 10 and have it auto bypass everything and give me a working install of win11 easily.

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kccuber
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

kccuber wrote:

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

kccuber wrote:

-ElectronicArts- wrote:

quick question: how to instal windows 11 on an unsupported device
https://technoresult.com/create-windows-11-bootable-usb-for-unsupported-device-using-rufus/
you will need to also not be scared of the registry. Don't worry give it a try, you won't break anything. There's some registry keys you'll have to edit after booting the USB to make the installer let you get past not having TPM.
you dont need registry hacking skills for the linked tutorial, i suggest you actually thoroughly look at posts before replying
I can literally boot off a Windows 11 boot media and it won't let me install unless I do the registry hack. I preferably use that unofficial windows media tool and upgrade from windows 10 and have it auto bypass everything and give me a working install of win11 easily.
read the article please, it uses RUFUS (which has an option to remove the TPM and Secure Boot requirement thing) not the MICROSOFT MEDIA CREATION TOOL


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MagicCrayon9342
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

kccuber wrote:

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

kccuber wrote:

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

kccuber wrote:

-ElectronicArts- wrote:

quick question: how to instal windows 11 on an unsupported device
https://technoresult.com/create-windows-11-bootable-usb-for-unsupported-device-using-rufus/
you will need to also not be scared of the registry. Don't worry give it a try, you won't break anything. There's some registry keys you'll have to edit after booting the USB to make the installer let you get past not having TPM.
you dont need registry hacking skills for the linked tutorial, i suggest you actually thoroughly look at posts before replying
I can literally boot off a Windows 11 boot media and it won't let me install unless I do the registry hack. I preferably use that unofficial windows media tool and upgrade from windows 10 and have it auto bypass everything and give me a working install of win11 easily.
read the article please, it uses RUFUS (which has an option to remove the TPM and Secure Boot requirement thing) not the MICROSOFT MEDIA CREATION TOOL
Not the MS media creation tool lmao, the unofficial one entirely written in BATCH and powershell that automates the entire thing. It does use the MS creation tool but heavily exploits the program lmao. I was not aware of such Rufus update.

Last edited by MagicCrayon9342 (Jan. 6, 2022 22:36:00)


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9pfs
Scratcher
100+ posts

Windows 11

https://textsynth.com/playground.html has some opinions regarding Win11.
Windows is {good, bad} on any system?

With the recent Microsoft patches out and the company pushing out the Windows 10 'Redstone' update, users have a lot of new questions about Windows 10 - and especially about the Windows 10's new 'Windows as a service' (WaaS) feature.

Is it secure?

The first question is simple - is the Windows 10 operating system fundamentally safe? It's difficult to assess something like this, since we don't have the source code to Windows 10. The security team at Microsoft has an extremely tight grip over Windows development, to ensure that Windows 10 is safe. As a company with billions of dollars invested in Windows, it's not surprising that they take security seriously - and that's without a doubt a good thing.

Microsoft has gone to great lengths to address known security problems in Windows 10, such as Meltdown and Spectre. The company has released patches to all supported Windows versions, and they've also updated the Windows Defender built-in antivirus, as well as the Edge browser. It's not a given that all these updates will address the current issues.

But I can't tell if Windows 10 is safe or not.

You should be able to tell if Windows 10 is safe or not. Unfortunately, it's not as easy as you might think.

We need to be careful not to overstate the safety of Windows 10 - it's not 100 percent bullet-proof. But as a basic rule, you shouldn't run a system with known vulnerabilities. I've never met a software developer who's okay with seeing vulnerable software on a user's machine - so it shouldn't come as a surprise that a software vendor is going to make the effort to get it right.

Some of the things Microsoft's patching to Windows 10 are just about the hardware (like protecting against Meltdown). There's also code that's been added to Windows 10 to help protect against things like Spectre and Flashback. But some of the software in Windows is not going to be patched as much - and some of the parts of Windows that would have been patched are being removed from Windows 10 entirely.

Microsoft is patching other software, too. Office 2016 is vulnerable to Spectre, but that doesn't make the patch for Windows 10 unsafe. The Spectre issues apply only to systems running 64-bit Windows; 32-bit Windows is not affected. So the Windows 10 patch simply removes 32-bit Windows' old support for 32-bit applications. That's not an issue for most users - only some older Windows software.

While many of us are using Windows 10 on our own PCs and smartphones, Windows 10's safety is not solely an issue for users. Microsoft's focus is the security of Windows as a whole - and they are working to keep Windows as a service.

What can we tell about Windows 10's security?

We've gotten a lot of data from the Windows 10 Insider Program, where users report to us when their computers are infected with malware. If users don't explicitly get their PC infected by a virus, then there's no chance that a third-party has compromised their machine - it has to come from an internal exploit.

But there's no 100 percent way to guarantee Windows 10's safety, so we have to be careful in how we present information about this. While we're not sure what the future will bring, we've gotten a lot of data from Windows 10's own Insider program, where users report to us when their computers are infected with malware. If users don't explicitly get their PC infected by a virus, then there's no chance that a third-party has compromised their machine - it has to come from an internal exploit.

This is how many of the security issues affecting Windows 10 have occurred. From our data, most of the problems come from internal exploits in Windows; the bugs themselves aren't a big deal.

That said, you should still make sure your system is running the latest version of Windows, because even the latest version of Windows 10 isn't bug-free. There have been security issues with the OS since it's first public release - and as a result, many users are now on version 1809, with further updates likely in the near future. (Microsoft's most recent update, 1909, came out in February.) If you aren't using Windows 10 1809, you might as well be running Windows 7 or 8 - the risk is the same.

It's also true that Windows 10 has been targeted by at least one malware strain. This means there's a chance that the malware could be coming through a different hole in Windows 10 - but that malware has been around longer than Windows 10, so it's probably something users need to be aware of.

We've also received complaints from users that they were hit by the recent Spectre and Meltdown exploits. Some of these complaints are simply user error - after all, many people aren't patching their systems, or don't know how to patch them. Others, however, are due to system instability from the recent patches - something the company is aware of, and trying to track down.

So is Windows 10 safe?

I think we have to be careful in our presentation of the data - but I'm definitely comfortable saying that Windows 10's security is fine, and that you shouldn't be worried.

My main argument for this is that Windows 10 has a large user base, with a large number of developers and testers. While there are some holes to be found in Windows 10, the level of impact is very small.

On the other hand, I'm not convinced that Windows 10 is 100 percent safe - I don't think that software is inherently safe. But the Windows 10 security is on the right track, and I don't think you need to worry about it. It's not your system that's going to be exploited, but the company's own software is.

The good news is that Windows 10 is in a very good state of affairs, thanks to its large user base. Because Windows 10 is so widely used, the chances of an attack are tiny - and the company has spent a lot of time and money on cleaning up.

Windows 10's security has been in the process of becoming more secure since Windows 10 first came out, when Windows 10's security wasn't quite as strong as it is now. Microsoft has made a lot of changes since then, starting with the removal of legacy desktop applications, and getting closer and closer to "Windows as a service" - it's made a lot of changes in that time.

As a result of all of that work, Windows 10 is in a very good state of affairs, thanks to its large user base. Because Windows 10 is so widely used, the chances of an attack are tiny - and the company has spent a lot of time and money on cleaning up.

As a side note, this is where Windows 10's focus on its "Windows as a service" can be seen. Windows 10 has its problems - especially with its UI and design, and how it treats third-party software. This is not an issue of Windows 10 itself, but of how Windows 10 is bundled and marketed. (It's a common refrain from users, especially those who are stuck with Windows 10 Pro.) Microsoft is working to improve this situation, so that users don't have to worry about compatibility or upgrades, but it's not likely to change.

I think you can trust Windows 10's security. As a side benefit, you won't have to worry about compatibility or updates - you can safely stick to the same system for a long time to come.

Where do I get the updates?

Windows 10 has been updated regularly for almost two years now. If you're running Windows 10 1803 or newer, you're up-to-date, and should be fine.

But if you're running Windows 10 1903 or earlier, you might not be as up-to-date. These versions of Windows are affected by Meltdown and Spectre, and the security patches have been available to users since January. There's a chance you might not get any updates - after all, the patches haven't been out for that long, and users aren't going to wait a few days just to get a bug fixed.

Again, this isn't a problem you need to be worried about. Windows 10 1903 is a long way behind current Windows versions; it's like being stuck on Windows 7 - you'll have some problems, and may have some bugs - but there's little chance that something is going to go wrong.

There's a chance you won't get any updates. After all, the patches haven't been out for that long, and users aren't going to wait a few days just to get a bug fixed.

So what do I do?

If you're not running Windows 10 version 1809, I'd recommend updating to that version as soon as you can. It's the latest available, and it's much more secure than older versions. It may not be as stable, but that should be something that can be dealt with.

The security patches, in particular, are only a handful of days old, so there's no reason you need to wait a few days to get them. There are also regular updates to come, so you should get the latest version as soon as it comes out.

It's not a bad idea to make sure your machine is clean and free of malware, too. You don't need to go through everything - but it's a good idea to go through the settings and make sure that anything in your profile or registry is clean. (You can check that by going to Settings → System → Security. You can disable or remove some features in your registry - but be aware that it's not recommended to remove anything unless you have a firm understanding of what you're doing.)

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Scratchfangs
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

I downloaded Windows 11 last week, but it was really, really, really slow. So I reverted back to W10. I love the designs and animations, and I'm wishing a new update will port some W11 animations, effects, and designs to W10.

Chiroyce
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

Scratchfangs wrote:

I'm wishing a new update will port some W11 animations, effects, and designs to W10.
Very very very unlikely sadly.







April Fools' topics:
New Buildings in Scratch's headquarters
Give every Scratcher an M1 MacBook Air
Scratch should let users edit other Scratchers' projects
Make a statue for Jeffalo
Scratch Tech Tips™
Make a Chiroyce statue emoji


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Scratchfangs
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

Yeah, my PC actually didn't support W11, so I looked online for a tutorial to download W11 when your PC doesn't meet the minimum requirements. I mean, what else did I think would happen with 4GB of RAM, an OG Intel Pentium CPU, and no GPU .

MagicCrayon9342
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

Scratchfangs wrote:

Yeah, my PC actually didn't support W11, so I looked online for a tutorial to download W11 when your PC doesn't meet the minimum requirements. I mean, what else did I think would happen with 4GB of RAM, an OG Intel Pentium CPU, and no GPU .
ofc it would be slow your computer sucks

but.. there is a solution in the dark. Think of a penguin and you may just figure it out.

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Scratchfangs
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

but.. there is a solution in the dark. Think of a penguin and you may just figure it out.
Most programs I use on a daily basis like Minecraft Bedrock are only available for Windows.

MagicCrayon9342
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

Scratchfangs wrote:

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

but.. there is a solution in the dark. Think of a penguin and you may just figure it out.
Most programs I use on a daily basis like Minecraft Bedrock are only available for Windows.

Bedrock is literally the worst version of Minecraft. It's a complete ripoff full of bugs and bad changes. Get java when you can, no rush.
hi

back on topic.

Last edited by MagicCrayon9342 (Jan. 9, 2022 16:51:45)


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dhuls
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

Bedrock is literally the worst version of Minecraft
Ever played New Nintendo 3DS edition?

NFlex23
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

Bedrock is literally the worst version of Minecraft.
How about Minecraft Pi edition? It's far more limited than Bedrock.
MagicCrayon9342
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

NFlex23 wrote:

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

Bedrock is literally the worst version of Minecraft.
How about Minecraft Pi edition? It's far more limited than Bedrock.
That's discontinued and out of the question.
Also its offtopic

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mybearworld
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

NFlex23 wrote:

How about Minecraft Pi edition? It's far more limited than Bedrock.
I thought that was Minecraft

2+2*5 = ?
2+2*5 = 20
2+2*5 = 12
2+2*5 = 77034585053198940266692661
Socialix
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

Sometimes, I just wish Microsoft changes the emojis in Windows 10 with the Windows 11 ones. Seriously, I still can't see emojis from 2020 with 21H1 and the outlines ruin the emojis. This is just Firefox's fallback emoji font (Twemoji Mozilla) which is a weird combination of Google and Twemoji:

socialix - wwdc - why is there a penguin breaking my window? - i use inconsistent operating system version 10 btw - signatures are overrated
NFlex23
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

mybearworld wrote:

(#2077)

NFlex23 wrote:

How about Minecraft Pi edition? It's far more limited than Bedrock.
I thought that was Minecraft
It is Minecraft, just a free version for the Raspberry Pi. It's much more limited in almost every way possible.
Maximouse
Scratcher
1000+ posts

Windows 11

NFlex23 wrote:

MagicCrayon9342 wrote:

Bedrock is literally the worst version of Minecraft.
How about Minecraft Pi edition? It's far more limited than Bedrock.
It is Bedrock, just a very old version that was already outdated when it was first released.


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