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DIY
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500+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

I'm surprised no one else has opened a forum thread as of yet for J.K. Rowling's fabulous debut crime novel, The Cuckoo's Calling, given that it's been weeks following the revelation of the real author behind the pseudonym Robert Galbraith. For those of you who haven't heard of Rowling's newest piece of work, this summary found in the book's blurb should give you a very skeletal idea of what the story deals with:

When a troubled model falls to her death from a snow-covered Mayfair balcony, it is assumed that she has committed suicide. However, her brother has his doubts, and calls in private investigator Cormoran Strike to look into the case.

Strike is a war veteran - wounded both physically and psychologically - and his life is in disarray. The case gives him a financial lifeline, but it comes at a personal cost: the more he delves into the young model's complex world, the darker things get - and the closer he gets to terrible danger . . .

My personal opinion of the book is that it is fantastically written and is pretty entertaining as a maiden crime fiction novel. Despite having low expectations when I commenced reading, the plot really picks up towards the end and absorbs the reader with all the events. My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!

Do discuss your views and thoughts on The Cuckoo's Calling below. Please feel free to share your favourite characters and moments in the story. Myself, I found Strike to be quite an imaginative protagonist, who evokes both empathy and sympathy from the audience. Robin Ellacott, John Bristow and Freddie Bestigui were among my other picks. In case you've forgotten some of the names, this list from Wikipedia should be helpful:

Cormoran Strike is a down-on-his-luck private investigator. He has few clients, a large debt, and is obliged by a recent break-up to move into his office. He has lost his leg in the Afghanistan war.
Robin Ellacott, aged 25, is Strike's temporary secretary, recently moved from Yorkshire due to becoming engaged. She is enthusiastic about detective work, and is very intelligent and competent.
Lula Landry (Bristow), a 23 year old professional model who died from a fall three months prior to the events of the novel. The subject of Strike's investigation is to determine
John Bristow is Lula Landry's adopted brother, and Cormoran Strike's client. He works for Tony Landry in a large family law firm.
Tony Landry is Lula and John's maternal uncle. He disapproved of Lula's lifestyle and is having an affair.
Lady Yvette Landry is Lula and John's adopted mother. She is terminally ill during the events of the novel and her relations with Lula were strained.
Evan Duffield is Lula's on-off boyfriend. He was the initial suspect in the media at the time of Lula's death, but he has a numerous witnesses to an alibi. He argued with Lula before her death.
Lucy Strike is Cormoran Strike's judgmental younger sister. Strike attends her son's birthday party during the novel.
Rochelle Onifade is a homeless friend of Lula from and outpatient clinic. She was aware of Lula's altered will and was blackmailing John Bristow with the information.
Guy Somé is Lula's designer. He is the one who calls her “Cuckoo”, alluding to the title of the novel. He was in Tokyo in the week leading up to her death, but is an astute character witness.
Deeby Macc is an American rapper who was supposed to arrive in the apartment below Lula's on the night of her death.
Kieran Kolovas-Jones is Lula's personal driver who has aspirations of fame as an actor.
Ciara Porter is a model and a friend of Lula
Freddy Bestigui is a film producer and neighbour of Lula. He is difficult to contact and a reputation of being difficult. He and his wife Tansy are in the process of splitting up.
Tansy Bestigui is Freddy's wife and a key witness, having overheard some events of the night. Her plausibilty is an issue for Strike and the police
Marlene Higson is Lula's biological mother, who opportunistically sells her story to the press at every opportunity. She lives in much poorer circumstances than Lula's adoptive family.

P.S. Wherever possible, try to avoid revealing key details and spoilers, such as the murderer et cetera, since there may be visitors to this topic who haven't read the book. Thanks!

Last edited by DIY (Aug. 9, 2013 09:27:25)

jukyter
Scratcher
100+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
DIY
Scratcher
500+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?

Last edited by DIY (Aug. 9, 2013 16:07:38)

jukyter
Scratcher
100+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
ClayChips
Scratcher
500+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
I don't think he's criticizing the book.

ClayChips, once had a legendary account called fetchydog567 now just a noob. Waiting to become just the same as his old account. But now, as the time goes by, I know now that i'm not a noob! I'm back! :D



jukyter
Scratcher
100+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

ClayChips wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
I don't think he's criticizing the book.
??? what's he criticising then
All4one
Scratcher
1000+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

jukyter wrote:

ClayChips wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
I don't think he's criticizing the book.
??? what's he criticising then
Probably the direction the author tended to go in, I think.

DIY
Scratcher
500+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

All4one wrote:

jukyter wrote:

ClayChips wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
I don't think he's criticizing the book.
??? what's he criticising then
Probably the direction the author tended to go in, I think.
Right that is. Just because I thought each person who was questioned unrealistically seemed at their own ease to relate their witness accounts or experiences to Strike in a similar manner doesn't mean that I'm scrutinising the whole book. It's a great read, and I'm definitely still a massive supporter of JKR's work.
All4one
Scratcher
1000+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

DIY wrote:

All4one wrote:

jukyter wrote:

ClayChips wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
I don't think he's criticizing the book.
??? what's he criticising then
Probably the direction the author tended to go in, I think.
Right that is. Just because I thought each person who was questioned unrealistically seemed at their own ease to relate their witness accounts or experiences to Strike in a similar manner doesn't mean that I'm scrutinising the whole book. It's a great read, and I'm definitely still a massive supporter of JKR's work.
To be fair, as the Harry Potter novels progressed, and the characters got older, the amount of swearing seemed to increase there, too. Like, remember around the very end of Deathly Hallows, and Mrs. Weasley cries out “NOT MY DAUGHTER YOU –”

Last edited by All4one (Aug. 10, 2013 05:45:02)


DIY
Scratcher
500+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

All4one wrote:

DIY wrote:

All4one wrote:

jukyter wrote:

ClayChips wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
I don't think he's criticizing the book.
??? what's he criticising then
Probably the direction the author tended to go in, I think.
Right that is. Just because I thought each person who was questioned unrealistically seemed at their own ease to relate their witness accounts or experiences to Strike in a similar manner doesn't mean that I'm scrutinising the whole book. It's a great read, and I'm definitely still a massive supporter of JKR's work.
To be fair, as the Harry Potter novels progressed, and the characters got older, the amount of swearing seemed to increase there, too. Like, remember around the very end of Deathly Hallows, and Mrs. Weasley cries out “NOT MY DAUGHTER YOU –”
Yeah, I'm not complaining about swearing as a whole. I really don't mind it, but it seemed to me that every person who was interviewed in this book had a similar style to their dialogue.

EDIT: Have you read The Cuckoo's Calling yet?

Last edited by DIY (Aug. 10, 2013 08:40:22)

All4one
Scratcher
1000+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

DIY wrote:

All4one wrote:

DIY wrote:

All4one wrote:

jukyter wrote:

ClayChips wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

jukyter wrote:

DIY wrote:

My sole criticism would be the amount of swearing that is present throughout the characters' dialogue, but hey, it's classified as a book for adults, so I'm not complaining!
what
Could you be more precise in what you mean by “what”?
a criticism is a complaint
I don't think he's criticizing the book.
??? what's he criticising then
Probably the direction the author tended to go in, I think.
Right that is. Just because I thought each person who was questioned unrealistically seemed at their own ease to relate their witness accounts or experiences to Strike in a similar manner doesn't mean that I'm scrutinising the whole book. It's a great read, and I'm definitely still a massive supporter of JKR's work.
To be fair, as the Harry Potter novels progressed, and the characters got older, the amount of swearing seemed to increase there, too. Like, remember around the very end of Deathly Hallows, and Mrs. Weasley cries out “NOT MY DAUGHTER YOU –”
Yeah, I'm not complaining about swearing as a whole. I really don't mind it, but it seemed to me that every person who was interviewed in this book had a similar style to their dialogue.

EDIT: Have you read The Cuckoo's Calling yet?
I actually haven't checked it out yet, but I'm interested in doing so, perhaps after I finish the book I'm currently reading.

honesty
Scratcher
100+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

Eh, the swearing was likely realistic though I haven't read it.

Was this leaked with J.K. Rowling's permission?

It just seems wrong to write a book under a pseudonym and then tell everyone who it really was just so you can sell it better.

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DIY
Scratcher
500+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

honesty wrote:

Eh, the swearing was likely realistic though I haven't read it.

Was this leaked with J.K. Rowling's permission?

It just seems wrong to write a book under a pseudonym and then tell everyone who it really was just so you can sell it better.
Initially, it was thought that an investigation carried out by The Sunday Times revealed the author. However, it was later discovered that one of Rowling's agents later leaked the fact on Twitter to a journalist.
DIY
Scratcher
500+ posts

"The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith

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